Race #5: The New Jersey Marathon, PART 2


The first half of the New Jersey Marathon began with a crisp pace and a sound feeling of confidence, as I mentioned in my prior blog entry.  This aura of confidence, however, began to weaken as the half marathon point arrived. 

 

As I crossed the mile 14 marker, I began to feel the energy oozing from my legs.  It felt as if the car I was driving sprung a rather substantial leak in the gas tank, and there I was behind the wheel watching the fuel gauge go from full to empty.  I’m no physiological mechanic; I don’t have the know-how to repair the leak in my fuel storage.  As the driver of this damaged vehicle, all I could do was cross my fingers and hope that I had enough unleaded in the well to get me to my destination.

 

When the realization hit me between miles 14 and 15 that the fuel was running out fast, I really went into full Watch Warrior mode.  I began the inward Mental Math: current pace per mile, number of miles left, the possible need to mix in running and walking toward the end, the cramping I was beginning to suffer in my calves, and the one variable that always comes into play during any 26.2 mile race I run: The Tool Factor. 

 

I began inwardly talking to myself, attempting to figure out what pace I needed to maintain in order to finish in 5 hours….or 5:15….or 5:20….

 

Me (spoken inwardly – I think): “I’m between miles 16 and 17 right now.  Three hours and five minutes down.  OK – let’s get to mile 20 by 3:50.  So I need to maintain a pace of…”

 

The Tool (never missing an opportunity to make a difficult situation even more unmanageable):  “….HEY!  What the heck are you doing?  Seriously – you’re attempting math while you’re running?  HA…HA…HA…”

 

(That laugh.  That horrible, shrieking laugh that courses up my spine and turns a grin into a frown.  That tiny 4-inch Tool sounded like a cross between Robert DeNiro in Cape Fear and the Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz.  Just like nails on a chalkboard, the sarcastic laughter echoed in my head.  It made the math feel like Calculus.) 

Me: “…so hit mile 20 by 3:50 gives me 70 minutes for the final….”

 

As I continued to attempt to work out the numbers in my head, The Tool decided to begin singing show tunes, just to screw with my focus…

 

The Tool:  “When you’re a Jet you’re a Jet all the way, from your first cigarette to your last dyin’ day….”

 

Me: “…..mile 20….gives me….an hour to get the last 10k done?  Wait….no….”

 

The Tool (the singing only getting louder and more annoying in my ears): “How do ya solve a problem like Maria!”

 

Me: “…wait. I got this.  I can hold an 11 minute pace.  What am I running at now?”

 

The Tool: “DEAR OFFICER CRUPKEY…CRUP YOU!”

 

Who would have ever thought that the lyrics from West Side Story would EVER come into play during a marathon?  Well..they did.  And The Tool was able to turn Tony Award-winning music into the equivalent of mental waterboarding.  The Tool had broken me with the most unexpected tactic: the music of Leonard Bernstein and the lyrics of Steven Sondheim.  Unreal.  As much as I hated the little 4-inch schmuck – I had to give him credit for creativity.  By mile 18, I was broken.

 

Broken.  It’s a horrible-sounding word, isn’t it?  I’ve heard the term in running a few times – just enough to fear it.  Let me describe what the feeling of being broken is like. 

 

Picture yourself running a marathon.  It’s a perfect day weather-wise.  You’ve trained well, so your legs are ready.  You know the pace per mile that you are comfortable with.  You’ve properly fueled and you’re well hydrated.  All systems are go.  The gun sounds.  Off you go.  Alongside you are a couple of people that seem to have the same pace as you.  You don’t feel like running alone, so you link up with them and begin chatting as you log your miles.  By mile 10 you realize “WOW!  I’m 6 minutes ahead of my schedule!  AWESOME!”  Now you’re half way home, and you realize again “WOW!  I just PR’d the half marathon by 9 full minutes!”  Life is goooood, right?  Well…MAYBE.  Now you’re 16 miles into the race, when you realize that your breathing is becoming a bit more difficult to keep under control.  The breaths are coming harder and faster than you’d like.  And your legs.  Hmmm.  They are beginning to feel a little squishy.  (That’s a term I just made up.  Yes.  Squishy legs – meaning the juice that you had in your legs at the beginning of this endeavor have been drained by the faster-than-planned pace that you pushed for the past 2-3 hours).  Now your body sends the messages to your brain:

 

Lungs: “Hey – this was easier in training runs.  Why the heck is it so difficult today?”

 

Legs: “Lactic acid sucks.  That’s just an FYI.”

 

Shoulders: “I’ve been swinging these arms back and forth for the past 3 hours.  When the heck is my coffee break?”

 

Your brain hears all these messages coming in, loud and clear.  All it wants to do is shut all these complaining body parts up.  The brain is like a librarian – all he wants is QUIET.  So what does the brain do?  He starts contemplating the possible ways to get what he wants: SILENCE.  This is where the first phase of the marathon mind game comes into play: the negative thoughts cascade through the runner’s head in order to make the pain – the noise – stop.

 

“Look – at that tree over there, begin walking.”

 

“This hurts.  You should have begun walking at that tree back there.  Now – see that manhole cover?  That’s where you’ll stop running.”

 

“Look.  You got to listen to me.  I’m your brain.  STOP RUNNING OR ELSE.”

 

You fight off these negative messages and press on, knowing that you are pushing limits that you never confronted before.  The messages get stronger.

 

“Look – you have to go to work tomorrow. Ease up.”

 

“There will be other Sundays.  Shut it down.  Now.”

 

…and then, there is that moment that the brain tosses out that one reasonable-sounding suggestion which, when combined with the pain you currently are experiencing, sounds too good to ignore:

 

“OK – just walk for a minute. Catch your breath.  Slow down.  Gather yourself.  Right…..now.”

 

And you listen.  You stop running at your current pace and begin to walk – just for a moment.  You don’t realize it yet – but you are now broken.  And it’s an incredibly difficult thing to recover from being broken.  At that moment, you made the race much more difficult for yourself.

 

Once you’re broken, the ability to recover and keep fighting against the road becomes the only challenge that matters.  The importance of obtaining a personal record loses its luster.  I know.  That’s what always happens to me.  And here – in New Jersey – it happened once more.

 

I struggled through the next 3-4 miles, hitting mile 21 at approximately four hours and a couple of minutes.  At this point in the race, I was running on vapors.  And then….in front of me…like a mirage…

 

There he was. 

 

Elvis.

 

As a mater of fact – 2 Elvii. 

 

 Dressed in white jump suits and rocking the huge Vegas glasses, two identical Elvii appeared in front of me.  I thought I was hallucinating.  So I did the only reasonable thing when faced with this sort of thing….

 

Me: “Long live the King!!!!”

 

Elvii (in unison): “…The King loves ya baby!”

 

You ever see one of those movies where the hero sweeps in at the last moment to save the day and foil the villain’s evil plans?  Well that’s the only way I can properly describe this moment.  The Tool suddenly disappeared from my shoulder and the pain that I felt in my legs took a back seat to this scene.

 

I spent the final 5-6 miles in a slow yet incredibly fun waddle with the King(s).  Every car that went by honked.  Every spectator cheered for the Elvii – and the energy was just the magic elixir I required.  The three of us laughed constantly as the final miles went by.  I have absolutely no idea what my time was – and I really didn’t care.  The pain was forgotten.  Running the last 5 miles with two Elvis impersonators was absolutely hysterical.  I crossed the finish line with them, wished them well and thanked them for a race that I won’t soon forget.

 

My mom and my daughter were waiting for me at the finish line.  I placed the medal around my daughter’s neck, and told her just how much I loved her, and how proud I was of her.  Then I reminded her of one important thing: there is no challenge you cannot overcome.  Sometimes it just takes sheer will.  Sometimes it takes tons of preparation and dedication.  But you have everything you need within you to conquer any challenge you face, as long as you do not surrender to your fears.  All it takes is all you’ve got.

 

There is nothing sweeter in this world than getting a spontaneous hug from your kid.  It’s like taking a shot of pure adrenaline. 

 

During the ride home, I thought about the day.  I started strong.  I felt great.  I lost my momentum and appeared to burn out early.  I fought the road for as long as I could before I broke.  Even though the course broke me, I kept putting one foot in front of the other.  And then: The Elvii.  I may not have been fast today – but I fought hard, and The Tool lost this round.

 

Two marathons in a week.  I was fried.  I was elated.  I felt beaten up, yet stronger than ever. Five down.  Just seven more to go.  Almost half way there.

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If you’d like some information on The Dream Team Project or would like to make a donation to their amazing cause, please stop by the website:  www.wdwradio.com/the-dream-team-project  I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I really believe in what The Dream Team Project stands for.  It raises money for the Make-a-Wish Foundation, helping to grant the wishes of children suffering from life-threatening illnesses.  Being s former wish-granter for the NYC Chapter of the Make-a-Wish Foundation, I can tell you first-hand just how much of an impact this organization makes in the lives of children.  Please consider donating to this worthy cause.  Thanks!

 

…and if you’d like a bit more information on the WDW Radio Running Team, please check out the Facebook page at: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/WDW-Radio-Running-Team/163606410344409

 

Race Number 5: The 2012 New Jersey Marathon – PART 1


The morning of my 5th race for my “12 in ‘12” project arrived with….well…absolutely no fanfare whatsoever. It was refreshing not to have to really travel for this race as I have all year long. I got changed, packed my bag for the day, and headed out the apartment door before 4am in order to catch mass transit to Penn Station, where a FREE New Jersey Transit train to the starting line awaited for a prompt 5am departure. It’s direct destination: Monmouth Park racetrack in southern New Jersey.

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The weather appeared to be absolutely perfect for a marathon, although the high temperature for the day would cross the 80 degree barrier. The train ride was relaxing and it allowed me to collect my thoughts for the day. I find that locating some time to close my eyes and visualize a successful run on Marathon Morning really works wonders to both relax my pre-race jitters and sets me forth upon the course with some much-needed confidence.

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As the train gently rocked back and forth like a fishing boat docked in a comfortable slip, I went through my mental preparation for the race. I closed my eyes and tried to picture the flat course, the quiet streets, and a steady pace. I took deep breaths as the course displayed itself in front of me within my mind. The mile markers flew by me, one after another as if they were lined up with only 100’s of feet between them instead of a firm mile. For some reason, I felt at ease with this race. As I opened my eyes, I felt truly calm. The positive visualization really worked this time around. Now all I needed was my theme music for the race – today’s selection was Ode to Joy. I played the piece in its entirety several times on my Iphone,This allowed the notes to become engrained in my head so that, when I needed something to call upon to either drive away the negative thoughts that were bound to flood my dense cranium thanks to the heartless work of The Tool, the work of Beethoven would drown his tiny squeaky voice out.

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As I strode from the train to the starting area, I ran into one of my Team for Kids coaches, Coach Vinny. First some effective positive visualization, add to it a heaping dose of Beethoven, and top it off with a coach that I consider to be one of the most positive-thinking guys I’ve ever had the pleasure of listening to. This was shaping up to be an excellent day. Coach Vinny and I chatted about running in general, this race, our upcoming goals – simple subjects to pass the time and maintain the positive aura that was really taking hold of the morning. Before we knew it, it was time to toe the line and get moving. Coach Vinny is an accomplished marathoner who’s run 26.2 in less than 3 ½ hours…and he’s constantly getting faster. In short: a good running role model to have. While he headed the to “A” corral – the corral for the competitive runners – I headed to Corral D – the one which housed all those who would not be threatening the current world marathon record of 2:03:02 this Sunday morning. We shook hands, wished each other good luck, and headed to our respective corners to start our slugfest against the asphalt.

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Once the gun went off, that positive air that I spent the morning cultivating carried me through the half way point of the race. I spent the first half of the marathon enjoying the sights of southern New Jersey, chatting with fellow runners who waddled along at the same pace as I was. As the mile markers continued to pass by, 7…8…9…my confidence grew. For the first time this year, I controlled my excitement and did not go out too fast early on in the race. I hit the half way point of the race at the 2 hour 20 minute mark. Right on schedule. All I needed to do was stay steady, and a personal best could well be mine.

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My first mistake was made as I passed the half way point of the race: I began doing Mental Math. And The Tool is an “A” student when it comes to the course of Mental Math.

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Every runner is different. Some live or die by their Garmin, Nike +, or Timex GPS watch. I think of this type of runner as a Watch Warrior. They constantly monitor their pace throughout the race by continuously glancing at their current pace per mile, their overall pace per mile, and their elapsed time. The clock is the motivating factor for this type of runner. They know what pace they need to maintain in order to exceed their goals. For these runners, keeping their pace at or below a certain set time per mile is like a person treading water in the middle of the Atlantic; keep your arms and legs moving at a certain rate and you keep your head above water. Slow down…and drown. The constant calculations between the statistics oozing out of the runner’s watch whilst running a marathon and comparing it to his/her goal time for the race is what I mean by Mental Math. It takes a tenacious runner to be a master mental mathematician.

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Other runners can simply feel their pace per mile. No satellite assistance required. Simply double knot your shoe laces and take off down the road. Mental Math was never their major. They never even took the class as an elective. I refer to these runners as Gazelles. They simply react to the moment. They feel like they need to pick up their pace – so they do. The clock doesn’t dictate their actions. There appears to be a simple freedom that comes with being able to run like a Gazelle. Don’t think – just run and let the clock take care of itself.

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Watch Warriors. Gazelles. All that matters is that the runner breaks the tape. Finish.

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As I hit the half way point of the race, I found myself attending Mental Math 101…and my professor was none other than The Tool. The second half of this race just became vastly more complex.

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_______________________________________________________

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If you’d like some information on The Dream Team Project or would like to make a donation to their amazing cause, please stop by the website: www.wdwradio.com/the-dream-team-project I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I really believe in what The Dream Team Project stands for. It raises money for the Make-a-Wish Foundation, helping to grant the wishes of children suffering from life-threatening illnesses. Being s former wish-granter for the NYC Chapter of the Make-a-Wish Foundation, I can tell you first-hand just how much of an impact this organization makes in the lives of children. Please consider donating to this worthy cause. Thanks!

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…and if you’d like a bit more information on the WDW Radio Running Team, please check out the Facebook page at: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/WDW-Radio-Running-Team/163606410344409

Hurdle Week


Normally, after running a marathon, I give myself 3 straight rest days before beginning to run again.  However, the New Jersey Marathon was only a week away, and I wanted to shake my legs out well before race day.  So I gave myself two days off before heading out on a light run early Wednesday morning.  The legs felt extremely stiff.  And I knew why: I simply don’t stretch well enough.

 

I keep saying to myself that I’ll focus more on taking the time each day to stretch out well before and after logging some miles.  Life, however, seems to always get in the way.

 

As the week progressed, I wondered how I would fare on Sunday.  I had only tried this once before: in 2009, I ran the Marine Corps. Marathon one week before running the ING New York City Marathon.  These two races, combined with a finish in mid-October in Hartford earned me entry into the Marathon Maniacs.  I don’t recall how I felt during those six days between races three years ago – but the discomfort was not unbearable…and that bode well.  One negative which was sure to show it’s face: I was sure to have lost some of the “pop” in my legs from one week to the next.  I was certain that the hills of Gettysburg took more out of me than I’d care to admit.  I needed to find some sort of catalyst to focus on to get me through next Sunday.

 

When I came up with my calendar of marathons for 2012, I circled this week as one of the two major “hurdles” of my year.  My thinking was that if I could get through this week and break the tape in New Jersey, things would be fairly smooth through the end of September.  Then…the real run begins.

 

After New Jersey, I plan to enjoy a month of training before the next 26.2 mile jaunt: Lake Placid.  Then off I go to San Francisco in late July.  Followed by a very interesting race in Rye, New York in August. September’s marathon will be in Ohio (remind me to wear my Michigan Wolverines football jersey (an old jersey with Elvis Grbac’s number on it…simply because anyone named Elvis is simply COOL).  Then, there will be two weeks of preparation before what I am nicknaming The 90-Day Odyssey” begins:

  • Late September: The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror 10 miler
  • Early October: The Chicago Marathon
  • Mid October: The Hartford Marathon
  • The First Sunday in November: The ING New York City Marathon
  • Mid November: The Wine & Dine Half Marathon
  • Around Thanksgiving: The Philadelphia Marathon
  • …and then…possibly….Vegas.  Oh yeah.  Vegas.

 

The 90-Day Odyssey. Should be interesting.  But – for now – I need to stay focused on the next step, which was coming up on Sunday.  The New Jersey Marathon.  Race number 5 of the 12 in ’12.  Right now, I felt positive.  I can do this.  But I recall a marathon that I ran a couple of years ago…I felt fantastic still at mile 14.  Someone noticed that I was smiling as a plodded forward, and asked me out of the blue….

 

Wise Old Runner: “hey – you look happy…”

 

My response: “Absolutely!!!”  (I had way too much enthusiasm in my voice – I’m sure I was obnoxious.

 

Wise Old Runner: “oh yeah?  You’re feeling good right now? I mean – reeeeeally good?”

 

My response: “Hell yeah!  Best I’ve ever felt 14 miles in!!!”  (still waaaay too much enthusiasm for the moment.  I know it.  He should have kneecapped me).

 

Wise Old Runner: “Hmmmm…..well don’t worry…..that won’t last.”

 

OUCH.

 

…..but….he was right.  I folded like a cheap lawn chair (no idea where I heard that saying, but I was dying to insert it into a blog…so there you go.  Enjoy) 4 miles later.  Crash.  Right into The Wall.  Face first.  He sure was a wise old runner.  I counted my chickens before they were hatched during that marathon (Oh God – that was a horrid reference.  Sorry.  But I’m not deleting it.  Call is a monument to my lack of creativity).  I won’t make that mistake this time around.  I cannot look forward.  I must look only to tomorrow.  And tomorrow starts in just a couple of hours. 

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If you’d like some information on The Dream Team Project or would like to make a donation to their amazing cause, please stop by the website:  www.wdwradio.com/the-dream-team-project  I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I really believe in what The Dream Team Project stands for.  It raises money for the Make-a-Wish Foundation, helping to grant the wishes of children suffering from life-threatening illnesses.  Being s former wish-granter for the NYC Chapter of the Make-a-Wish Foundation, I can tell you first-hand just how much of an impact this organization makes in the lives of children.  Please consider donating to this worthy cause.  Thanks!

 

…and if you’d like a bit more information on the WDW Radio Running Team, please check out the Facebook page at: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/WDW-Radio-Running-Team/163606410344409